History



Muhammad Ali
Beyonce Knowles-Carter
Frederick Douglas
Michael Jordan
Martin Luther King Jr.
Barack Obama
Rosa Parks
Condoleezza Rice
Harriet Tubman
Booker T. Washington
Oprah Winfrey
Malcom X


image-392881-SR-Divider.png



image-392881-SR-Divider.png


Molefi Kete ASANTE


100 Greatest African Americans is a biographical dictionary of one hundred historically great Black Americans (in no particular order; that is, they are not ranked), as assessed by Temple University professor Molefi Kete Asante.



Andrew Young​​​​​​​
55th Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia USA

This Is My Country

This Is My Country

Published on Nov 16, 2016

image-392881-SR-Divider.png



image-392881-SR-Divider.png



The Ancient Empire of Ghana was heavily impacted by the first Europeans who made their way to Africa, which were the Portuguese in 1471.

They came in pursuit of gold and this led to the start of the African slave trade, which the Europeans incorporated themselves in. The British fought for control over what was then known as the Guinea coast, which was the Ancient Empire of Ghana. The British successfully won control and renamed it the Gold Coast.

The Ashanti kingdom was the last section to be incorporated in the British Gold Coast and brought under British rule. They were reluctant to give into British rule, and also to give away the ancient golden stool that the British were so desperately eager to acquire from them once they got to know of it. So one female warrior named Yaa Asantewaa was determined to defend the Ashanti kingdom and make sure that the golden stool would not get into the hands of the British colonial power. Nana Prempeh the first at the time had ascended the throne as the new Ashanti hene. In 1874, the Gold Coast became an official British colony. As a result of opposing colonial rule, both Yaa Asantewaa and Prempeh were sent to an island east of mainland Africa called Seychelles in exile. Yaa Asantewaa died in exile in 1921, but Nana Prempeh managed to survive and was allowed by the British to return to the Gold Coast which was in 1924, 3 years after Yaa Asantewaa's death.

The slave trade in Africa made its way to North America where the African diaspora began. Slaves were working on plantations in the south and picking cotton. This led to Harriet Tubman's secret underground railroad discovery, which many slaves used as a way to escape from their slave masters. Slaves who were brought from Africa in ships were treated very horribly once they arrived in America, and even while they were on their way coming in the ships they were treated badly and living in deplorable conditions. Many were chained and shackled together. While in America over the years fighting for equal rights, it sparked the civil rights movement. This brought great civil rights leaders like Jesse Jackson, Malcolm X, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., among many others.

Recently the first Black democratically elected President of the United States of America (Barack Obama) visited Ghana and also went to see Cape Coast castle, a place where many slaves were kept in order to be brought onto the ships which shipped them off. He chose Ghana as the first country to visit in Sub-Saharan Africa since becoming President, and of course Africa as a whole. Many saw him as acknowledging and realizing Ghana's political and economic stability over other countries learning about the history of the slave trade in Africa. He even chose Ghana over his father's home country Kenya. It was then discovered that Ghana had become some sort of a pilgrimage for many African Americans who were and are interested in learning about the History of the Slave Trade.​​​​​​​

History of Africa's Slave Trade (Obama's Visit to Ghana)

Sep 29, 2012

President Barack Obama Visits Ghana

President Obama's Visit to Ghana ... (2009)


President Obama Speaks in Ghana ... (2012)


President Obama's Bilateral Meeting with President Mills of Ghana ... (2012)

President Obama and President John Atta Mills of Ghana speak to the press after a bilateral meeting in the Oval Office. March 8, 2012.


Ghana ... Located in West Africa ... *Capital City Accra

Gold Coast (Ghana) British colony 1821 - 1957
image-657972-Africa-Ghana_Map.png


Homecoming Journey to Ghana

 This is a documentary about an African-American who has returned to Mother Afrika in pursuit of connecting to land that his ancestors were uprooted from over 500 years ago. His journey, however, does not begin with his pilgrimage to Ghana. It starts with his leaving the US, living in various countries as South Korea, Thailand and now the Gulf region. But ultimately, these countries bring him closer to what his spirit desires: AFRICA.
​​​​​​​

Homecoming Journey to Ghana

Published on Apr 14, 2017


image-392881-SR-Divider.png



image-392881-SR-Divider.png


image-732073-The_Atlantic_Slave_Trade_B36px.png

Slavery has occurred in many forms throughout the world, but the Atlantic slave trade -- which forcibly brought more than 10 million Africans to the Americas -- stands out for both its global scale and its lasting legacy.

Anthony Hazard discusses the historical, economic and personal impact of this massive historical injustice.

The Atlantic slave trade: What too few textbooks told you - Anthony Hazard

Dec 22, 2014


image-392881-SR-Divider.png



image-392881-SR-Divider.png


image-732072-African_Scholar_Warriors_B36px.png

"We are a people who come from all parts of the world. Each one of us has worth and we should recognize in each other the humanity that is in all of us, the genius that lies in every human being if he/she's given a chance to fulfill it." - Sybil Williams-Clarke


​​​​​​​Key of Life Celebration
Dr. Leonard Jeffries and Prof. James Small talk continuing the History of the Black Power Movement and following​​​​​​​ the foundation of Dr. Ben and Dr. Clarke.
Published on Nov 30, 2016

Dr Yosef Ben Jochannan Black Man Wake Up

Dr Yosef Ben Jochannan The African and Religion


John Henrik Clarke - A Great and Mighty Walk



​​​​​​​Prof James Small History Comes Alive in Bermuda


Prof James Small Speaks On The Hebrew Israelites & Much More | SA NETER TV on YouTube


"FOOD FOR THOUGHT"

Dr. Jeffries and Bro. Small speak on African Conduct

Dr. Jeffries and Bro. Small speak on African Conduct

Sept 21, 2014
At the John Henrik Clarke House, Dr. Leonard Jeffries and Dr. James Small along with Honorary Doctorates in African Philosophy, Bro. Reggie and Bro. Pat speak on the Conduct of Africans as we engage in Dialogue, Planning and knowledge Debates with ourselves and other groups for African Liberation. Witnessed by Senior Brothers Lucha, Akil and Kwabena of the Sons of Africa!!!


image-392881-SR-Divider.png



image-392881-SR-Divider.png


image-732077-A_Hidden_Story_B36px.png

Tulsa Oklahoma ( Black Wall Street ) Race Riot

The Tulsa race riot was a large-scale, racially motivated conflict on May 31 and June 1, 1921, in which a group of white people attacked the black community of Tulsa, Oklahoma. It resulted in the Greenwood District, also known as 'the Black Wall Street' and the wealthiest black community in the United States, being burned to the ground.

During the 16 hours of the assault, more than 800 people were admitted to local white hospitals with injuries (the two black hospitals were burned down), and police arrested and detained more than 6,000 black Greenwood residents at three local facilities. An estimated 10,000 blacks were left homeless, and 35 city blocks composed of 1,256 residences were destroyed by fire. The official count of the dead by the Oklahoma Department of Vital Statistics was 39, but other estimates of black fatalities varied from 55 to about 300.

The events of the riot were long omitted from local and state histories. "The Tulsa race riot of 1921 was rarely mentioned in history books, classrooms or even in private. Blacks and whites alike grew into middle age unaware of what had taken place." With the number of survivors declining, in 1996, the state legislature commissioned a report to establish the historical record of the events, and acknowledge the victims and damages to the black community. Released in 2001, the report included the commission's recommendations for some compensatory actions, most of which were not implemented by the state and city governments. The state has passed legislation to establish some scholarships for descendants of survivors, economic development of Greenwood, and a memorial park to the victims in Tulsa. The latter was dedicated in 2010.
TULSA OKLAHOMA BLACK WALL STREET RACE RIOT

Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial

Published on Sept 24, 2020


" GREENWOOD "